Upper Silesia on fire - the actual beginning of World War II

We tend to think about the beginning of World War II in terms of September 1st, 4:45 am. However, as we have already explained in the article about the Gleiwitz incident, in border areas the war was already ongoing when Germany launched an invasion of Poland and SMS Schleswig-Holstein opened fire at the Polish positions on the Westerplatte. In the case of Upper Silesia, a region torn between Poland and Germany, the actual warfare was preceded by a series of diversionary activities, of which the Gleiwitz incident is the most known one. The actions were prepared by the military in cooperation with the Reich Main Security Office (Reichssicherheitshauptamt).

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Lorenz Hackenholt - Miscarriage of justice

Injustice evokes strong feelings of anger and disappointment. However, is the word “injustice” enough to describe the disappearance of Nazi officers who avoided trials and were thus never brought to justice?

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The Tragedy of Children in Kulmhof on the Ner

Young and innocent souls were not spared from slaughter by the Nazi war machine.

82 children from Lidice and Ležáky were murdered in Kulmhof on the Ner German extermination camp, as well as countless children from Zamojszczyzna.

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Pervitin - War on Speed

Sometimes ordinary cogs in the war machine just… do not seem to move fast enough. Enhancement is needed to achieve the expected results. And the human body can be enhanced with chemistry - alas, never without consequences. But who thought of consequences when they had Blitzkrieg on their mind?

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The Gleiwitz Incident

Look at any history book written for Polish schools. Usually, we can read that World War 2 is considered to have begun at the dawn of September 1, 1939, when Nazi Germany invaded Poland. But what about the Gleiwitz Incident, recognized by some sources as the actual beginning of the bloodiest conflict in the history of mankind?

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Ilse Koch, the Bitch of Buchenwald

While depicting a typical Nazi in your mind, you will – most likely – think about a well-built young male. However, we must not forget that women became aware members of the NSDAP and, of course, of the SS. SS women underwent strict training during which they learned how to become an efficient cog in the killing machine. Make no mistake – they committed unbelievable atrocities just like their male counterparts.

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Operation Anthropoid

Usually, when asked about what the face of evil looks like, an average person will point at Adolf Hitler. However, even just a quick glance at Hitler’s closest people reveals a myriad of sick, twisted minds.

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Rosie the Riveter

What is the most iconic image of a working woman? Many of us will point at the poster shown below, with a fierce young woman raising her fist and the phrase “We can do it!” on top. Although the woman from this particular poster was never officially called “Rosie the Riveter”, this very artwork is heavily associated with the social campaign encouraging female workers to start a job in the defense industries. 

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Phony War

Even though WW2 is often associated with fierce fights and dramatic turns of events, in fact, a very strange period occurred in its initial months. It is referred to as “Phony War” (French: Drôle de guerre; German: Sitzkrieg). What happened then?

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The Chemistry Behind Mass Extermination

Most of us, when asked about the substance used for murdering people on an industrial scale, will mention Zyklon B as the chemical agent behind the death of masses. In fact, there is one more simple chemical responsible for mass extermination – carbon monoxide from exhaust fumes.

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"Winter huffs and puffs."

The Germans lost the 1941 campaign due to frosts, becoming another victim of the Russian winter which they had not prepared for, just like Napoleon's Great Army. Truth as old as the hills. However, it's not true.

The Germans understood the seasons. Although they hoped that the campaign would end before winter, they had to prepare equipment for the occupation forces. The first instructions regarding preparations for winter were issued as early as in August. When Operation Typhoon, aimed at conquering Moscow, gets bogged down after the first successes (in mud rather than snow), uniforms and equipment will be prepared in warehouses for at least several dozen divisions. However, only a small part will reach the front.

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Shall "friendly fire" be disabled?

When on August 15 and 16, 1943, American-Canadian troops were landing on the island of Kiska in the Aleutian Islands in the North Pacific, people still remembered the fights from over two months before for the nearby island of Attu. Fortunately, Kiski's conquest was much less bloody. Only 313 people were wounded or killed. The result could have been much worse if only... there were Japanese on the island at all.

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„У нас много людей.”

One of the most widespread beliefs about the Eastern Front, repeated even in popular science books or documentary films, is that almost unlimited human resources contributed to the USSR's victory. But were these resources really inexhaustible?

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The anti-Nazi Boycott of March 24th, 1933

People often wonder what life was like in the 30s in terms of observing totalitarian parties rise to power. Were societies misinformed, or maybe unaware of the impending doom? Of course not. In response to abuse and harassment against Jews committed by the Nazis, an international boycott of German products was organized starting from March 24th, 1933, pursuant to Hitler being appointed the Chancellor of Germany on January 30th of the same year. What is interesting, some Jewish organizations supported the boycott, while some opposed it.

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Hitler by the balls

Hitler by the balls Hitler by the balls

This popular propaganda song was sung in various versions in Great Britain, at the very beginning of World War II, on the melody of the march "Colonel Bogey", more widely known from the movie "Bridge on the River Kwai". This is the best cultural evidence that the story of Hitler without one testicle has a long tradition. Did the leader of the Third Reich really have only one testicle and did he lose it during World War I?

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